Voigt House


Individual
Description
The Voigt family, whose home is now preserved by the Grand Rapids Public Museum, moved to the city in 1875 and resided at 133 Court Street (now Scribner Street). The Voigt family partnered with the Herpolsheimer family in the dry-good and carpet business and in a few years the partnership expanded to include two flour mills -- the Crescent and Star mills located on the Grand River. In 1902 the partnership came to a mutual end. The Herpolsheimer family retained the dry-good store and the Voigt family kept the two mills. By the turn of the century, Voigt flour under several brand names, and later Voigt Cereal, were known across Michigan and far east as New England. Due to bankruptcy and a strike, the flour milling business came to an abrupt end in 1955. In 1895, Carl G.A. Voigt hired local architect William G. Robinson to design a house on 115 College Avenue Southeast to serve as his retirement home. It was modeled after the chateaux at Chenoceaux, France. The home is a fine example of Victorian architecture and complemented the Victorian family that lived in it.  It was lived in by just the Voigt family which was comprised of Carl Gustav Adolf Voigt, his wife Elizabeth Wurster Voigt and their children. They were the parents of nine children with six surviving until adulthood. The family lived in the home from 1895 to 1971. 
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