Comments and Tags

You Buy ‘Em, We’ll Fly ‘Em, Defense Bond Stamp Poster, circa 1942. Created by J. Walter Wilkinson and Walter G. Wilkinson. This poster is one of six defense bond posters that award-winning commercial artist, J. Walter Wilkinson along with his son Walter created for the US Treasury Department during World War II. This poster depicts a young man in the cockpit of a US army fighter plane giving a thumbs up, while a squadron of US fighter planes fills the background. War bonds, known also as defense bonds or liberty bonds were originally issued in 1917 to help fund the first World War, bringing in a total of $18 Billion by the end of the war. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7th, 1941 the United States entered the Second World War. While still in the great depression the United States needed to fund yet another war, so they brought back the defense bond and renamed them war bonds. Series of advertisements for war bonds were carried out through all kinds of media including radio, newspapers, magazines, and newsreels in theaters to encourage Americans to invest. Many artists such as J. Walter Wilkinson and his son Walter were asked to create posters such as this during the second world war. The vibrant and colorful graphic designs often evoked strong emotions in those who viewed them. The idea of these posters was to give every American a sense of patriotism and confidence while allowing Americans to feel a sense of camaraderie that we are all in this war together. While primarily a tool for financial contributions to the war, these posters also motivated Americans to speed up productivity and were often used as a recruitment tool for young men to enlist in the military. By the end of the Second World War, more than 80 million Americans bought war bonds, bringing in $180 Billion in revenue for the war efforts.Taylor Long, 5/21/2020


Collection Tier:
Tier 2

Advertising
Posters
World War II ➔ Poster, You Buy 'em We'll Fly 'em

Identifier:
136662
Description:
This poster is one of six defense bond posters created by J. Walter Wilkinson and Walter G. Wilkinson for the U.S. Treasury Department during World War II. It depicts a young man in the cockpit of a U.S. army fighter plane giving a thumbs up while a squadron of U.S. fighter planes fills the background. War bonds, known also as defense bonds or liberty bonds, were originally issued in 1917 to help fund World War I, bringing in a total of $18 billion by the end of the war. After the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7th, 1941, the United States entered World War II. To help fund the war, defense bonds returned and were renamed war bonds. Advertisements for war bonds were carried out through various media outlets including radio, newspapers, magazines, and newsreels in theaters to encourage Americans to invest. Many artists such as J. Walter Wilkinson and his son Walter were asked to create posters such as this to encourage contributions to the war. The vibrant and colorful graphic designs often evoked strong emotions in those who viewed them, giving many Americans a sense of patriotism and camaraderie that we are all in this war together. While primarily a tool for financial contributions, these posters also motivated manufacturers to speed up productivity and were often used as recruitment aids. By the end of World War II, more than 80 million Americans bought war bonds, bringing in $180 billion in revenue for the war efforts.
Date:
1942
Materials:
Paper
Current Location Status:
In Storage
Source:
Gift Of Old Collection
Rights:

Exhibit/Program
Leagues of Their Own (2003)
Makers/Donors
Government Printing Office

Old Collection