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Collection Tier:
Tier 3

European
Headwear
Clothing Accessories
World Culture Clothing ➔ Glengarry

Identifier:
2008.1.15
Description:
This Glengarry was commonly worn by members of pipe bands as casual Highland wear. It features a tartan of green, yellow, and red, possibly from the Clan Buchanan. Traditional male clothing would also include a long shirt tied at the neck, a black jacket, a matching tartan kilt, a sporran that hangs from the belt, knee-high socks, and black low heeled shoes. 

The Glengarry bonnet was invented in Scotland in 1794 by Alexander Ranaldson MacDonell of clan MacDonnell of Glengarry. This woolen cap became a statement piece of the Scottish regiments of the British Army and featured a foldable boat-shape with ribbons draped down the back. The top is often decorated with a pom-pom called a toorie that can be red, royal blue, or black depending on the soldiers' troop. 
Date:
1950 – 1970
Materials:
Wool Felt, Knit, Ribbon
Dimensions:
4" h 10.5" w 4" d
Current Location Status:
Education Program
Source:
Museum Collection
Exhibits/Programs
Discovery Kit: Hats (November 2018)
Discovery Kits include a variety of artifacts and specimens from the Museum’s Collection that allow students to investigate global and local objects. The Collections support the Museum’s mission of inspiring curiosity and discovery around science, history, and culture. Each kit includes objects from the Museums archives, helpful resources and suggested activities. Discovery Kits are a great way for teachers to incorporate primary source and object-based learning into the classroom or as a way to prepare for or extend a Museum visit.

Virtual Discovery Kit: Hats (May 2020)
Hats and headwear have been worn for centuries by people around the world to serve a variety of purposes, cultural traditions and religious practices. This resource provides tools and activities for investigating a number of hats in the Grand Rapid Public Museum’s Collections.
Related Place
Scotland