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Collection Tier:
Tier 2

Model, Wigwam

Identifier:
115545
Date:
1941
Dimensions:
8" h 14.75" w 13" d
Current Location Status:
Education Program
Rights:

Exhibits/Programs
Discover: The First People of this Place (Grades K-3) (October 14 2019)
Long before Europeans came to Michigan, Grand Rapids was the site of a Native American village. Native American villages along the Grand River would have looked very different from our present city of Grand Rapids. The First People of this Place program will discuss three Native American tribes of the Great Lakes region--Odawa (Ottawa), Ojibwe (Chippewa) and Bode'wadmi (Potawatomi). Together, these peoples form the tribes of the Three Fires and are collectively called the Anishinabek. Students will be introduced to traditional life ways, the respected role of elders, and storytelling. Program activities allow students to learn history firsthand by handling artifacts, participating in traditional children’s games, and listening to Anishinabe stories.

Objectives:

  • Students will be able to explain who the first inhabitants of Michigan were and how long humans have inhabited Michigan.
  • Students will be able to describe how the clothing, food, shelter, and technology of Michigan’s Native Americans have evolved through time.
  • Students will analyze examples of traditional and modern Anishinabe culture present in exhibit areas and in primary sources.

Curriculum Connections:

  • Michigan K-12 Social Studies Standards: H1 The World in Temporal Terms Historical Habits of Mind, H2 Living and Working Together in Families and Communities, Now and Long Ago, H3 The History of Michigan and the Great Lakes Region, G2 Places and Regions, G4 Human Systems, G5 Environment and Society, P1 Reading and Communication, P2 Inquiry Research and Analysis
  • ELA Common Core Standards for Reading
  • NGSS Science and Engineering Practices: Constructing Explanations


Discover: The First People of This Place (Grades 4-8) (October 14 2019)

Long before Europeans came to Michigan, Grand Rapids was the site of a Native American village. Native American villages along the Grand River would have looked very different from our present city of Grand Rapids. The First People of this Place program will discuss three Native American tribes of the Great Lakes region--Odawa (Ottawa), Ojibwe (Chippewa) and Bode'wadmi (Potawatomi). Together, these peoples form the tribes of the Three Fires and are collectively called the Anishinabek. Students will be introduced to traditional life ways, the respected role of elders, and storytelling. Program activities allow students to learn history firsthand by handling artifacts, participating in traditional children’s games, and listening to Anishinabe stories.


Objectives:

  • Students will be able to explain who the first inhabitants of Michigan were and how long humans have inhabited Michigan.
  • Students will be able to describe how the clothing, food, shelter, and technology of Michigan’s Native Americans have evolved through time.
  • Students will analyze examples of traditional and modern Anishinabe culture present in exhibit areas and in primary sources.

Curriculum Connections:

  • Michigan K-12 Social Studies Standards: H1 The World in Temporal Terms Historical Habits of Mind, H2 Living and Working Together in Families and Communities, Now and Long Ago, H3 The History of Michigan and the Great Lakes Region, G2 Places and Regions, G4 Human Systems, G5 Environment and Society, P1 Reading and Communication, P2 Inquiry Research and Analysis
  • ELA Common Core Standards for Reading
  • NGSS Science and Engineering Practices: Constructing Explanations

Makers/Donors
Museum Division, Work Projects Administration

Works Progress Administration
The Works Progress Administration (known also as the W.P.A. or WPA, and renamed the Work Projects Administration in 1939) was a federal program developed in response to the widespread unemployment and economic need people in the United States were experiencing during the Great Depression. The goal of the W.P.A. was to provide one paid job to each household affected by long-term unemployment, thereby replacing a direct-relief model of federal aid with a work-relief model. The program was established on May 6, 1935 and was terminated in 1943 due to low unemployment rates caused by the onset of World War II.

A 1939 pamphlet Questions and Answers on the WPA describes a W.P.A. project as “any useful public work on which the Federal Government and some tax-supported public body have agreed to cooperate, through the WPA, in order to provide work for the needy unemployed. The project is a community or State enterprise which the WPA helps to carry out; the completed project belongs to the community or State.” The pamphlet further specifies that projects should be “on public property,” “socially useful,” and “not be a part of the regular work of the sponsoring agency, such as should be wholly financed out of its own regular funds.”

The way the W.P.A. worked in most cases was that state and local government sponsors initiated and planned projects that were submitted to W.P.A. administrators for approval. Once a project was approved, sponsors employed workers (skilled or unskilled) whose wages were paid by the W.P.A.; land, materials and equipment were funded/supplied by the sponsors. There were, however, some nationwide infrastructure projects that were sponsored and largely funded by the W.P.A.’s Division of Engineering and Construction.

The W.P.A. was a massive program, employing 3,334,594 people at its peak in November 1938, with many subdivisions that focused on different tasks and types of projects over the life of the program. One of the most conspicuous components of the W.P.A. was collectively known as Federal Project Number One; it consisted of five different parts: the Federal Art Project, the Federal Music Project, the Federal Theatre Project, the Federal Writers’ Project, and the Historical Records Survey.

[This description of the W.P.A. is a work-in-progress. More details are forthcoming.]

Related Place
Grand Rapids