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Collection Tier:
Tier 2

Weapons
Science and Technology
Weapons ➔ Revolver, Colt Model 1861 Navy

Identifier:
112778
Description:
Model 1861 Colt new style Navy 6 shot revolver. "Colts Patent" engraved. "-Address Col. Sam L Colt New York U.S. America" stamped on barrel. "Colts Patent No 5108" stamped on cylinder. "1589" stamped 4 times on handle, barrel and trigger. Brass, Iron and Wood;1861 Colt .36 caliber Navy Model revolver. The Navy model was a cap and ball, six shot, single action like the earlier 1850 model. The revolver used paper cartridges, a cartridge consisting of nitrated paper, a pre-measured black powder charge, and a bullet that was either a round ball or a lead conical bullet. The 1861 Navy saw widespread use during the American Civil War. Although not as popular as its Army cousin, the lighter recoil of the .36 caliber made the Navy popular with the cavalry. In the United States, the only competition to Colt's design was the Remington Model 1858.;1 line address on top of barrel. "ADDRESS COL. SAML COLT NEW-YORK U.S. AMERICA";Maker: Colt 
Model: Navy
SN: 5108
.36 cal 

 
Date:
1862
Materials:
Iron, Wood, Brass
Dimensions:
5" h 1.5 | "" w 13 | "" d
Current Location Status:
Education Program
Source:
Gift Of L. H. Udell
Rights:

Makers/Donors
Udell, L. H.

Robert Davis

Colt's Manufacturing, LLC
 Samuel Colt asserted his vision for the revolver came to him in 1831, when, as a seventeen year old seaman, he observed that a ship's wheel had spokes that lined up with compass points. He then had a vision for a gun with a spinning cylinder that would lock into place with the simple action of cocking a hammer. He would patent the design in Great Britain in 1835, and the United States in 1836. The revolver design gave birth to the Peacemaker, "The Gun that Won the West." Colt would succeed the Peacemaker with the 1911, the Cobra Revolver and the M16 among others. The company remains in business, producing handguns over 180 years after the first revolver was patented.

Sources: https://www.americanheritage.com/army-colt# 
 https://www.colt.com/timeline